Tag Archives: innovazione

Beyond the three Fs: basic income as innovation policy

Three months into Edgeryders I am in awe at the generosity and the creativity with which so many young people take their journey through life. Some leave the career path that seems easiest, even at considerable personal sacrifices, insearch of something deeper; most desire to “do something useful”. They think big, and are not afraid to confront global problems like food security, the redesign of social ties, access to housing. All this energy is channeled into innovation, often marked by a refreshing radicality: urban farming, co-housing, social currencies, open public sector data, urban games to reappropriate public spaces, home schooling, peer-to-peer learning, you name it.

Innovators are a minority, as they always have been. But this minority differs from those of the past in two ways: it is numerically large, probably up in the millions, rather than the tens of thousands of a century ago; and it is self-selected, and internally very diverse. Though many innovators are members of the élites, with immaculate academic credentials, others are free spirits, university dropouts intolerant of departmental hierarchies, self-taught. The best indicator of the distance between young innovators and the élites is simple: so many of them are poor, barely able to make a living but not of amassing any wealth (hat tip: Vinay Gupta). There is a joke going around: if you are looking for the capital to launch a social innovation initiative, don’t waste your time asking banks, venture capitalists or governments agencies. The only people who support this stuff are “the three Fs”: family, friends and fools (hat tip: Alberto Masetti-Zannini).

The scale and diversity of the minority of innovators opens up the way to a completely new perspective: an adaptive innovation policy. Current public policies for innovation operate by selecting a priori, with the help of famous academics, a limited number of strategic research strands, normally framed in big science terms (like cold fusion or nanotech) and throwing money at them. A different approach has just become possible: do a great many small investments in a logic of diversification, letting a great many innovators choose which issues to tackle and how; monitor for lucky breaks or interesting solutions; and then scale the investiment on those that have already yielded something tangible. The idea is to reward innovative activities not for their direction, but for their results. This approach has the advantages of depending far less on the a priori wisdom of policy makers; and of discovering a posteriori which issues the innovators community finds more worthy of their efforts, and which lines of work are more likely to yield concrete results. It is a low-cost approach to evaluation, which can be very costly if you do it properly.

I was thinking about these things on Sunday, as I participated in a conference on basic income. Basic income is income decoupled from work or wealth: everybody has a right to it, just for existing. I am no expert, but I understood it is framed as a measure targeted at establishing the dignity of the individuals, making them more safe and harder to intimidate. All of this makes a lot of sense; still, I can’t help thinking that basic income could also be seen as an instrument of innovation policy: free from immediate need, (mostly young) citizens would be enabled to take some extra risks and try out more new ideas. Most would fail, as is always the case, but failures would be effectively too cheap to even meter, while successes could have large impacts, easily able to pay off the whole operation. I suspect the social cost of basic income would be near zero: people are surviving anyway, so the whole thing amounts to a reallocation of purchasing power from the wealthy and employed to the poor and unemployed.

All of this translates into an innovation policy mix that invests less on activities (lab research) and organization (corporate R&D units or universities) and more on people. The basic idea is give them the means to attack problems they care about solving, then get out of their way and, later, evaluate their results. It’s common sense, really, unless you think people – young people, in this case – are generally cynical, lazy or worse.

Financial innovation for social business: what are the risks?

Antonella Noya all’OECD (grazie!) mi ha passato un loro rapporto, The Changing Boundaries of Social Enterprises, in cui si cerca di fare il punto sugli ultimi dieci anni di impresa sociale nei paesi industrializzati. Sono stati anni importanti per questo settore, da tutti i punti di vista: di crescita e strutturazione, legislativo e anche finanziario. Da quest’ultimo punto di vista un riassunto potrebbe essere questo: le imprese sociali sono sottocapitalizzate, e stentano in particolare ad accedere a strumenti finanziari diversi dal prestito (loan) e dal contributo (grant). Molta innovazione finanziaria ha cercato di risolvere questo problema. Antonella Noya at OECD (thanks!) pointed me to their report The Changing Boundaries of Social Enterprises, in which they attempt to render the past ten years of social enterprise in developed countries. It’s been an important ten years for this sector, from all points of view: growth, legislation and finance too. From a finance perspective, an executive summary could as follows: social enterprises are undercapitalized and find it difficult to access financial instruments other than traditional loans or grants. A lot of financial innovation was thrown at the problem.

Il rapporto OECD fa un elenco impressionante: venture philantropy, prestiti “pazienti”, piattaforme di crowdfunding à la Kickstarter, indici per misurare la performance sociale degli investimenti come i Dow Jones Sustainability Indices e così via. Tutto bene? Sì e no. Sì, perché il problema esiste e si sta cercando di affrontarlo. No, perché si stanno facendo cose che ricalcano un po’ troppo da vicino la precedente ondata di innovazione finanziaria — quella, tanto per capirci, che ha portato alla crisi globale del 2008. The OECD report has an impressive list: venture philantropy, “patient” loans, crowdfunding platforms à la Kickstarter, social performance assessment tools like the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices and so on. All’s well then? Yes and no. Yes, because the problem exists and is being looked into. No, because it is being addressed in a way which is a little too reminiscent of that other wave of financial innovation, the one that gave us the 2008 global meltdown.

Considerate Blue Orchard. La loro idea è semplice: mettere in comunicazione gli investitori istituzionali (per esempio i fondi pensione), che vogliono comprare prodotti finanziari etici, con il microcredito. E come si fa? Per cominciare si fanno molti microprestiti. Ciascun prestito corrisponde a un attivo nel bilancio del microcreditore. A questo punto il microcreditore prende tutti questi piccoli attivi di bilancio, e li usa per garantire l’emissione di un’obbligazione (cioè uno strumento finanziario derivato da quello primario, cioè il microprestito) che poi rivende all’investitore istituzionale. Fatto! Quest’ultimo ha fatto un investimento etico senza bisogno di imparare a distinguere tra loro i microprestiti e i microcreditori. Per contro, l’istituzione di microcredito ha reperito liquidità aggiuntiva, e può fare altro microcredito. Perfetto, no?Consider Blue Orchard. It’s a simple idea: connect institutional investors (say, pension funds) wanting to invest ethically with microlending. How does that work? It begins with some institution making microloans. Each of them creates an asset in the balance sheet of the microlending institutions. Now this microlender takes all of these assets, packages them up and uses them as collateral to back a bond (which is a derivative product, its primary being of course the microloans) which he then sells to the institutional investor. And it’s done! The latter has been enabled to invest ethically without actually having to be able to tell which microborrowers to lend to. At the same time, the microlending institution has gained extra liquidity, and can go on to make more microlending. Great!

Non necessariamente. Questo processo in finanza si chiama cartolarizzazione: il suo effetto ultimo è quello di allontanare il debitore dal creditore finale. Prima della cartolarizzazione i mutui casa venivano concessi da banche locali, che conoscevano il debitore ed erano ragionevolmente in grado di valutarne l’affidabilità. Se quest’ultimo si trovava in cattive acque, la banca locale faceva il possibile per consentirgli di ristrutturare il debito: in fondo si trattava di un cliente e di un membro di quella comunità, ed era interesse della banca che la comunità che serviva fosse il più prospera possibile. Con la cartolarizzazione, però, il mutuo del signor Rossi viene impacchettato con altri in uno strumento derivato, e rivenduto a un investitore non locale: se va bene un fondo, se va male un hedge fund molto aggressivo. Appena Rossi ritarda con un pagamento, questo investitore non ha nessuna ragione di essere comprensivo: farà la cosa che gli conviene nell’immediato, visto che non partecipa alla comunità locale in cui Rossi vive. Cosa faranno i fondi pensione che comprano i prodotti Blue Orchard se dovessero trovare che i rendimenti sono troppo bassi? Se decidono che devono rientrare immediatamente dei loro crediti, quale sarà l’effetto di questo rientro sul microcreditore? Può essere costretto a rientrare a sua volta, compromettendo il beneficio sociale di avere investito sul proprio lavoro?Or is it? The process described is called securitization. One of its effects is to separate the borrower from the final lender (in this example the pension fund). Before they got securitized, home mortgages were issued by local banks, that knew borrowers personally and could assess their creditworthiness reasonably well. If they got it wrong and the borrower found it difficult to repay the debt, the bank would do its best to get him back on track, possibly restructuring her debt: after all, she was a client, and lived in the same local community as the bank. The more prosperous the community, the better things were for the bank. After securitization, all this changed: now John Smith’s mortgage is repackaged and sold to a nonlocal lender — a pension fund at best, a very aggressive hedge fund at worst. As soon as Mr. Smith starts falling behind with his payments, this investor has no reason to be understanding: it will try to maximize its immediate gain, as he has no stake in Smith and his community’s long-run prosperity. What will the pension funds that purchase Blue Orchard’s products if they find that the returns are too low? If they decide to exit fast, what will the consequences be for the microborrowers? Could they be forced to pay their debit back or lose their assets too? Could this wipe out the social benefit of the poorest of the poor investing in themselves?

Discorsi simili si possono fare per i “mercati di capitale etico” in via di collaudo in diversi paesi, come ETHEX nel Regno Unito o la Bolsa des Valores Sociais in Brasile. Il mercato azionario che conosciamo ha portato molti capitali alle imprese for profit, al prezzo di indurle a una prospettiva di breve termine: un buon risultato trimestrale è fondamentale per non perdere la fiducia del mercato. Cosa succederebbe alle imprese sociali le cui azioni (sì, alcune emettono azioni) fossero scambiate alla borsa di Londra o New York?Similar questions can be asked for ethical capital markets being rolled out in some countries, like ETHEX in the UK or Bolsa des Valores Sociais in Brazil. The stock market as we know it brought a fresh stream of capital to for profit enterprises, but at the price of making them focus away from long term growth and onto quarterly results. What would happen to social enterprises once their shares (yes, some do issue shares) are traded in Wall Street or London?

Sono domande inquietanti. Ma fare finta di niente sarebbe peggio: non abbiamo scelta se non cercare le risposte.These are unsettling questions. But looking the other way would be much worse: we have no choice butlook fo the answers.

Innovazione finanziaria per l’impresa sociale: quali sono i rischi?

Antonella Noya all’OECD (grazie!) mi ha passato un loro rapporto, The Changing Boundaries of Social Enterprises, in cui si cerca di fare il punto sugli ultimi dieci anni di impresa sociale nei paesi industrializzati. Sono stati anni importanti per questo settore, da tutti i punti di vista: di crescita e strutturazione, legislativo e anche finanziario. Da quest’ultimo punto di vista un riassunto potrebbe essere questo: le imprese sociali sono sottocapitalizzate, e stentano in particolare ad accedere a strumenti finanziari diversi dal prestito (loan) e dal contributo (grant). Molta innovazione finanziaria ha cercato di risolvere questo problema.

Il rapporto OECD fa un elenco impressionante: venture philantropy, prestiti “pazienti”, piattaforme di crowdfunding à la Kickstarter, indici per misurare la performance sociale degli investimenti come i Dow Jones Sustainability Indices e così via. Tutto bene? Sì e no. Sì, perché il problema esiste e si sta cercando di affrontarlo. No, perché si stanno facendo cose che ricalcano un po’ troppo da vicino la precedente ondata di innovazione finanziaria — quella, tanto per capirci, che ha portato alla crisi globale del 2008.

Considerate Blue Orchard. La loro idea è semplice: mettere in comunicazione gli investitori istituzionali (per esempio i fondi pensione), che vogliono comprare prodotti finanziari etici, con il microcredito. E come si fa? Per cominciare si fanno molti microprestiti. Ciascun prestito corrisponde a un attivo nel bilancio del microcreditore. A questo punto il microcreditore prende tutti questi piccoli attivi di bilancio, e li usa per garantire l’emissione di un’obbligazione (cioè uno strumento finanziario derivato da quello primario, cioè il microprestito) che poi rivende all’investitore istituzionale. Fatto! Quest’ultimo ha fatto un investimento etico senza bisogno di imparare a distinguere tra loro i microprestiti e i microcreditori. Per contro, l’istituzione di microcredito ha reperito liquidità aggiuntiva, e può fare altro microcredito. Perfetto, no?

Non necessariamente. Questo processo in finanza si chiama cartolarizzazione: il suo effetto ultimo è quello di allontanare il debitore dal creditore finale. Prima della cartolarizzazione i mutui casa venivano concessi da banche locali, che conoscevano il debitore ed erano ragionevolmente in grado di valutarne l’affidabilità. Se quest’ultimo si trovava in cattive acque, la banca locale faceva il possibile per consentirgli di ristrutturare il debito: in fondo si trattava di un cliente e di un membro di quella comunità, ed era interesse della banca che la comunità che serviva fosse il più prospera possibile. Con la cartolarizzazione, però, il mutuo del signor Rossi viene impacchettato con altri in uno strumento derivato, e rivenduto a un investitore non locale: se va bene un fondo, se va male un hedge fund molto aggressivo. Appena Rossi ritarda con un pagamento, questo investitore non ha nessuna ragione di essere comprensivo: farà la cosa che gli conviene nell’immediato, visto che non partecipa alla comunità locale in cui Rossi vive. Cosa faranno i fondi pensione che comprano i prodotti Blue Orchard se dovessero trovare che i rendimenti sono troppo bassi? Se decidono che devono rientrare immediatamente dei loro crediti, quale sarà l’effetto di questo rientro sul microcreditore? Può essere costretto a rientrare a sua volta, compromettendo il beneficio sociale di avere investito sul proprio lavoro?

Discorsi simili si possono fare per i “mercati di capitale etico” in via di collaudo in diversi paesi, come ETHEX nel Regno Unito o la Bolsa des Valores Sociais in Brasile. Il mercato azionario che conosciamo ha portato molti capitali alle imprese for profit, al prezzo di indurle a una prospettiva di breve termine: un buon risultato trimestrale è fondamentale per non perdere la fiducia del mercato. Cosa succederebbe alle imprese sociali le cui azioni (sì, alcune emettono azioni) fossero scambiate alla borsa di Londra o New York?

Sono domande inquietanti. Ma fare finta di niente sarebbe peggio: non abbiamo scelta se non cercare le risposte.